Analysis of the poem soliloquy of spanish cloister by robert browning

Even though he cannot see that lust in his eyes, he knows that it is the case.

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Nevertheless it shares many of the features of the dramatic monologues: an interest in sketching out a character, an attention to aestheticizing detail, and an implied commentary on morality. Further, the speaker talks about the melon plants that Brother Lawrence is trimming for the dessert that will be served to the monks.

Presenting himself as the model of righteousness, the speaker condemns a fellow monk, Brother Lawrence, for his immorality; but we soon recognize that the faults he assigns to Lawrence are in fact his own.

Your myrtle-bush wants trimming?

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In the seventh stanza, the speaker moves to darker territory as he realizes that a "text in Galatians" explains how a sinner will sin progressively more and be damned for it. Summary This highly entertaining poem portrays the grumblings of a jealous monk who finds his pleasures more in the flesh than in the spirit.

Soliloquy of a Spanish Cloister In the next stanza, the thoughts of the speaker move to a darker territory as he speaks about sin and damnation of the sinners.

Analysis of the poem soliloquy of spanish cloister by robert browning

In the seventh stanza, the speaker moves to darker territory as he realizes that a "text in Galatians" explains how a sinner will sin progressively more and be damned for it. For this, his language is the only tool which means that the form of the poem does not aids its content much. The speaker of the poem accuses Brother Lawrence of a number of vices that he himself is guilty of committing. Presenting himself as the model of righteousness, the speaker condemns a fellow monk, Brother Lawrence, for his immorality; but we soon recognize that the faults he assigns to Lawrence are in fact his own. This takes the attention of the speaker to the two women who are washing their hair in a water tank nearby. Summary This highly entertaining poem portrays the grumblings of a jealous monk who finds his pleasures more in the flesh than in the spirit. First, while this poem is grouped as one of Browning's dramatic monologues, it is not technically a monologue but instead a soliloquy, a speech where the speaker shares his inner thoughts. Water your damned flower-pots, do! This type of structure created by the speaker brings us to the conclusion that the speaker has long passed the point of being merely annoyed with Brother Lawrence, and that the rage he feels towards the innocent monk has been long endured. Even when he thinks of the presumably lewd French novel as a way to ensnare Brother Lawrence, he ironically reveals his own knowledge of the book. What makes the speaker so interesting is that instead of admitting his own guilt the speaker instead projects his own lust for the women onto Brother Lawrence in the effort to make the innocent monk look blameworthy. As the third stanza begins, the reader starts to understand that the hate that the speaker has is not some harmless strife as he comments about the eating habits of the monk.

Lines However, this is not the only sexually related event. Certainly, Browning does not mean to suggest that all priests are as deeply hypocritical as this speaker, or that we are all so wicked, but he does suggest through this masterful sketch how adept any individual can be at justifying his own subjective truth, and how the complications of our psychology often work against us by allowing us such license to rationalize our otherwise-ungrounded feelings and actions.

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He says that there are twenty nine ways in which sinners can be damned and he will make sure that if Brother Lawrence is not damned in one way, he will try another to make sure that he fails. The speaker, anonymous outside his vows as a monk, despises Brother Lawrence from some unspecified envy, though he rationalizes his envy under the guise of piety. Buy Study Guide Summary The poem "Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister" is written in nine stanzas and is narrated by an unnamed Spanish monk who watches in hatred and envy as Brother Lawrence waters plants. As with most of Browning's characters, what comes across most of all is the human complications of psychology, whereas institutions like religion are thin disguises of these more ordinary emotions. The speaker concocts a plan to "trip him" into sin right before he dies, so that Brother Lawrence will then be sent to hell. He snaps out of Brother Lawrence's voice as he sees the latter break a flower he is watering, which the speaker mocks to himself. Also, in lines , Browning compares the rinsing of the cups to a sacrificial ceremony. He says that after eating, he never puts his knife and fork down in a cross as a sign of respect for Jesus. On the surface, the poem may seem to be a light historical piece, the utterings of a grumpy but interesting monk—however, it repeatedly approaches a tone similar to that used by the more strident of Victorian essayists and religious figures. The first stanza opens with the speaker's intense hatred of Brother Lawrence, who the speaker insists would perish "if hate killed men. The content of the poem clearly sets the paradoxical mood; the form, though, emphasizes it in such a way that the reader needs not carefully analyze it to understand what Browning was trying to say. He is so determined to send him to hell that he would not miss any chance of doing the same, even when it means he has to face hell himself.

Remember: This is just a sample from a fellow student. So nice! With the second stanza, the speaker starts to think about their meals when he is supposed to sit with Brother Lawrence.

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Soliloquy of a Spanish Cloister by Robert Browning